Stereotypes & Whisky?

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It’s odd the things you think about at 1:30am isn’t it? The other night I was lying awake thinking about the different styles of whisky you get from Britain and USA and the stereotypes of the people from those countries. Then I started to connect some dots…

Let me start by saying this is meant to be light-hearted and fun – so I hope no one gets too offended!

Lets start with the good old US of A!

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USA Stereotypes:

  • Loud, brash, in your face and overly emotional.
  • Impatient, fast food addicts.
  • Patriotic, gun toting, flag wavers.

Now I haven’t explored much American whiskey so far but what I have tried I have found to be very upfront and in your face with bold flavours. No hidden depths there, just a loud brash statement of “here I am, now salute the flag”.

Bourbon tends to be bottled at a young age or not have an age statement, older aged bourbons are more scarce and more expensive. Come on America – learn a little patience and let your whiskey age a few more years! In their defence the USA is only about 340 years old so they don’t have much concept of time yet…

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Now for the last one I’m going to look specifically at Tennessee whiskey. Lets face it Tennessee whiskey is just bourbon made in Tennessee (with an additional filtering step). Even though most international trade agreements legally define it as a bourbon they still insist on the delusion that it’s actually Tennessee whiskey. If that doesn’t come across as a stubborn, patriotic-esque attitude then I don’t know what does.

So after seemingly blasting my American cousins it’s time to turn my attention closer to home. It’s time for some good old British self-deprecation.

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British Stereotypes:

  • We’re reserved to the point we keep our emotions completely hidden from the world.
  • We’re elitist snobs who look down on others. We also all know the Royal Family – no really we do, I get smashed on gin with old Queenie at least once a month!
  • We are experts at queuing and would join a queue for anything just for the enjoyment of being in a queue.

What you get on the surface of our whisky isn’t necessarily what it’s like underneath and it can take time to uncover hidden, more subtle flavours. Just like our hidden emotions our whisky doesn’t like to open up easily – stiff upper lip, what ho!

Scotch whisky is the best in the world, even if Jim Murray doesn’t think so. All of these other countries trying to cash in on the whisky boom need to learn that they’ll never compete with Scotch… and yes when I say “British” whisky I am of course always talking about Scotch!

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When it comes to whisky we might not queue exactly but we will wait… and wait… and wait… In fact the only reason we have whisky aged for so long is because we love to queue and wait for things even if it’s completely unnecessary to do so!

 

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3 Comments Add yours

  1. drhoytsm says:

    Very good! But, I fear you need to consider the impact of globalization! What do you make of those of us from the U.S. who have a obsessive preference for Scotch? Although, I doubt that you would find many from the U.K. who would have a preference for American Whiskey! A trade imbalance?

    Like

    1. Agreed, there is preference for Scotch… that’s because it’s the best in the world 😉 It will in truth though be at least in part down to the mystique attached to Scotch. After all that’s where it all started… Okay maybe it started in Ireland really but you won’t hear many Scots admit to that! American whisky is on the rise here in Britain, recent figures actually showed Jack Daniel’s outselling everything else over here, not sure why though :-/

      Liked by 1 person

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