Haig Clubman

Haig Clubman.jpg

Please take into account that these are my personal tasting notes and personal experience, as such you may interpret these whiskies differently from me.

On the 13th July 2017 I took part in the second of a series of blind tastings run by Brian who runs the Malt Musings blog. The idea was simple, five of us select 3 whiskies each and send samples to each other – each of our samples are given a letter to represent us and a number to represent where in the tasting they will be used. We then taste through the samples live on Twitter and try to guess what they are. It’s a great test of your tasting abilities but also really enjoyable to try something without any pre-conceptions based on origin, abv etc.

To read a review of the first blind tasting you can go to Brian’s post here. Our next live tasting is taking place this Wednesday (26th) at 8pm and you can follow along with #BlindTasting. In the run up to the third tasting I will be posting my tasting notes for each of the whiskies tried in our second session.

Colour:

Pale gold.

Nose:

Light, citrus (lime), pine needles and something sweet – a sort of biscuit quality. Vanilla, custard and rhubarb – just like rhubarb and custard sweets.

Palate:

Pine, slight vanilla and citrus (lime). Fruit gums comes to mind now.

Finish:

Floral, sweet and again citrus (lime) / fruit gums.

Overall:

This one was odd – the pine needles on the nose and pine on the palate shouldn’t work but somehow do. For a dram that has received a lot of hate I actually enjoyed it – it was light and had enough in it to make it interesting. Maybe not one I’d go out of my way to have but certainly wouldn’t hear any complaints if I was offered a glass.

In fact I feel Haig should be applauded for what they are trying to do here – making whisky more accessible and breaking down some of the stereotypes that whisky is for old men in tweed suits only. Why is it such a hated brand then? Well quite simply I think it’s due to a) their marketing campaign which despite their attempts to break down stereotypes still portrays whisk as a prestige item and b) the cost. Now the Clubman is actually an alright priced dram, the Haig Club on the other hand is a whopping £45 a bottle. Although I’ve not tried the Haig Club (yet) from what I’ve heard it does not warrant that price tag…. I’ll have to try it for myself to make that judgement though.
*EDIT: also David Beckham – that man should not be the face of a whisky brand! Sorry Beck’s fans #sorrynotsorry *

 

Notes:

Tasting notes taken from the The Haig website.

 

HAIG CLUB CLUBMAN

Haig Club Clubman inherits the same bold and progressive spirit as Haig Club Icon – designed to be different, stylish and modern whilst incorporating nearly 400 years of House of Haig heritage. The inspiration for the name can be found in advertising materials dating back to the 1920s, in which Haig was advertised as “The Clubman’s Whisky”.

Haig Club Clubman is matured exclusively in American ex-bourbon casks, allowing the sweet, gentle Single Grain Scotch Whisky from Cameronbridge to interact with the vanilla, butterscotch and sweet toffee flavours found in the ex-bourbon casks. The result is a wonderfully smooth, sweet and enjoyable whisky.

Haig Club Clubman is delicious straight-up, or on the rocks, although the perfect way to enjoy this Scotch Whisky is with cola. The sweet, vanilla and coconut flavours combine perfectly with the sweet caramel of cola, creating an approachable and delicious drink, which is refreshing in taste and perfect in its simplicity. If you already love Scotch then you’ll enjoy this combination of flavours and if you’re new to Scotch this is the ideal introduction.

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